Best Practice Examples

So much good practice goes on in this school. This section is dedicated to all the fantastic things that staff see when observing lessons.

Keep checking as this list is constantly changing!

TEACHING TIPS OBSERVED 

 STARTER

  • Use of straight forward settler’ worksheet at the start of a lesson, with a class that needs settling.
  • Laptop/Projector set up with 5 starter questions on inequalities.
  • Starter  –  paired  –  pick students at random to explain at end  –  students must attempt questions in case they are picked.
  • Plenary – students make up a question for use in a starter in a following lesson.
  • Excellent starter exercise → props used to get pupils to think about lesson aims and title – mystery approach.
  • Sheet issued at start of class

K W L (see below)

Very effective involvement of students in learning/predicted learning outcomes etc.

K

(What I know already)

W

(What I want to know)

L

(What   I have learnt)

 Complete at the start of the lesson                   Complete at the end of the lesson

 PLENARY

  • Finish the lesson with a question that develops the learning further.
  • Plenary  –  Memory game  –  shapes projected for 1 minute, then questions asked based on this e.g. which shape above the circle etc.  (great linked with revision).
  • Students picked at random (having been told that they would be) to summarise the lesson.
  • Plenary – students make up a question for use in a starter in a following lesson.
  • Keeping a group on focus by small steps but ‘challenging’ (just above the level) and using QA, Te and that the class is ‘together’.  Eliminating stress by giving the ‘option’ of pairs.  Finishing activity (all quiet to study slide for 1 minute) then questions asked, ensure quiet before end of lesson.
  • Use of memory test  (slide on Powerpoint) to end a lesson.  1 minute to study then questions based on e.g. what stage was in the middle
  • Plenary activity – questions from box relating to lesson – students select one and have to answer, explain, develop statement.
  • Plenary, to monitor understanding of concepts introduced that lesson : all hands up.  If you understood all of ___, keep 5 fingers out;   if you understood most, 4 fingers etc (another version of ‘traffic- lighting’).  Interesting too – done with ‘all eyes closed’.
  • Plenary : quiz – one side of class v other side.  Slide of answers shown at front.  Teacher asks question.  Two volunteers – one from each group – point to appropriate answer to gain point.  After each question, change volunteers

TEACHING 

  • Praising students as frequently as possible – but not ‘cheaply’.
  • Human balance to explain solving equations gets students moving and nice physical way to demonstrate a tricky topic.
  • Match up exercise shapes and names on cards stuck on board (kinaesthetic activity).
  • Revision session  –  Given 9ns with wrong solutions.  Asked for correct solution and to provide reasons why.
  • Students relate well to practical examples, to aid with understanding of principles.
  • Including information on history of number which interests more able in mixed ability class  –  encouraging them into their own research and further learning.
  • Keeping a group on focus by small steps but ‘challenging’ (just above the level) and using QA, Te and that the class is ‘together’.  Eliminating stress by giving the ‘option’ of pairs.  Finishing activity (all quiet to study slide for 1 minute) then questions asked, ensure quiet before end of lesson.
  • Use of student answers with common errors  –  class have to correct  –  to explain the incorrect reasoning behind the wrong answer  –  and then to explain the correct reasoning.
  • Making lesson real  –  bringing in Euros for a lesson involving conversions.
  • Using students to physically demonstrate teaching points.
  • Reference to exams / levels / marks
  • Clarity of instructions (and variety of instruction).
  • Use of DVD for modelling
  • Practical demonstrations using computer/projector very useful for exemplar work.
  • Question set at the start of the lesson, set up as a ‘mystery’.  It runs through lesson, and is answered in the course of the lesson.
  • Using really good revision techniques as model for learning during a normal lesson e.g. diagrams
  • Putting stickers on a model in a group to show parts of body.
  • Two excellent activities for revision for end of unit topic:
  1. Back to back.  One student describes the structure of a bacterium/virus on the board while the other tries to draw it.  Best one wins.
  2. Speed-dating.  Students invent 2 questions on the topic then go round trying to find partners who can answer both.
  • Good idea to stop students moaning about not being able to do the work or having to do homework etc, they are only allowed 2 moans a lesson each. Allows it to be dealt with in a light way.
  • Using another member of department team (just for 10 minutes) to enter class in-role – to give impetus/belief to the situation – ideas generated.
  • Whole class focussed speaking/listening activity (students responsible for learning).
  • Use a story or an anecdote to help provide a structure for the lesson – it gives a kind of narrative framework to the lesson.
  • Use a differentiated sheet to help to provide a tighter framework for the discussion process.
  • Walkabout – a good way to share work is to have the class walk around the room looking at each others work – especially good in terms of practical work or design ideas.
  • Use images (and, especially, the juxtaposition of images) to provoke and stimulate discussion.
  • As exam revision: put the class into pairs or small groups and introduce a game show element – each section of the exam becomes a ‘round’ in the game – questions can be asked individually (person nominated by the group) or they can confer or they can phone a friend!

BEHAVIOUR

  • Use of straight forward settler’ worksheet at the start of a lesson, with a class that needs settling.
  • Counting down  to get particular behaviour e.g. “by the time I get to 1, all rulers down”.
  • Use of folders for classes that lose work, need a lot of write-on sheets
  • Book missing  –  student quietly told that they will be seen at the end of the lesson.
  • Count down (calmly) to re-focus class and ensure all stopped pair work/discussion and now listening – avoids all need to ask for silence etc – keeps excellent sound level.

QUESTIONING

  • Ask question of whole class  –  then say “say the answer to the person next to you” – before asking for feedback to the whole group.
  • Allowing thinking time.
  • Students making choices of who should answer questions, rather than teacher all the time: e.g. nominating each other (starting with questions from hat).
  • Very strong expectation of low noise level (partner-voice).  Interesting to know how this expectation is created and sustained.
  • Whole class discussion – inner and outer circle – outer circle have to record discussions – points which they can then use to add on extra layer of understanding.
  • Allow room at times for speculative discussion/conversation – and give time for individual students to develop their ideas perhaps through analogy. 

DISPLAY/organisation 

  • Separate homework book.
  • Maths – teacher has three permanent headings – attractively presented and stuck to the white board:

OBJECTIVES, HOMEWORK AND CLASSWORK.

Really good for the students to have this up there to check at any point during lesson.

  • The creation of the right learning environment can have a real impact – recent work on display (especially work by that class), mobiles and models.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *